GDPR has cut ad trackers in Europe but helped Google, study suggests

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An analysis of the impact of Europe's new data protection framework, GDPR, on the adtech industry suggests the regulation has reduced the numbers of ad trackers that websites are hooking into EU visitors.

But it also implies that Google may have slightly increased its marketshare in the region — indicating the adtech giant could be winning at the compliance game at the expense of smaller advertising entities which the study also shows losing reach.

The research was carried out by the joint data privacy team of the anti-tracking browser Cliqz and the tracker blocker tool Ghostery (which merged via acquisition two years ago), using data from a service they jointly run, called WhoTracks.me — which they say is intended to provide greater transparency on the tracker market. (And therefore to encourage people to make use of their tracker blocker tools.)

A tale of two differently regulated regions

For the GDPR analysis, the team compared the prevalence of trackers one month before and one month after the introduction of the regulation, looking at the top 2,000 domains visited by EU or US residents.

On the tracker numbers front, they found that the average number of trackers per page dropped by almost 4% for EU web users from April to July.

Whereas the opposite was true in the US, with the average number of trackers per page rose by more than 8 percent over the same period.

In Europe, they found that the reduction in trackers was nearly universal across website types, with adult sites showing almost no change and only banking sites actually increasing their use of trackers.

In the US, the reverse was again true — with banking sites the only category to reduce tracker numbers over the analyzed period.